Prime. Dark colors, stains (once sealed), and previously unpainted surfaces (drywall, spackle, etc.) will need a primer coat, usually white. NOTE: most paint stores & home improvement centers will now tint primer (at no charge) to match fairly close to the color of the finished coat, that way two coats of primer need not be applied.[6] Although not all surfaces need a prime coat, skip this step at your peril! Dark colors will likely show through the first -- or even the first couple-- topcoats of paint. Sealants and unpainted surfaces like spackle patches will absorb or repel moisture in a topcoat at a different level than the areas surrounding them. Applying a good primer coat will help even out these differences. Primer equalizes a wall to a uniform surface. It's like erasing a canvas before drawing a new picture. Although some will argue the point, you generally don't need to spend a great deal on primer or buy special primer. A cheap, 5 gallon (18.9 L) bucket of plain, flat white paint will usually do the trick and cover a large area. Give your primer at least 24 hours to dry (follow its instructions) before applying a topcoat. House Painting
"There are a small number of timeless and classic shades we always find ourselves coming back to when searching for the perfect neutral," says Alicia Weaver of Alicia Weaver Design. "Alaskan Husky (1479) by Benjamin Moore is one of them. It is a classic shade of gray that complements accent colors." Light silvery grays work beautifully in guest bedrooms and front entryways.
Use a roller to paint the rest of the wall. A good method to use is the 'W method'. You start by painting a large 3 foot (0.91 m) square W on the wall. Then, without lifting the roller, you fill in the W.[7] You can paint a wall section-by-section, and do the walls one at a time for best results. It's generally a good idea to use an extension pole for your roller instead of standing on a ladder. Make sure that neither the extension pole nor the roller has plastic handles, as plastic handles are flexible and this makes it difficult to control the painting. House Painting
The cost per square foot will vary depending on the geographic region, the type of paint product used, the conditions of the surfaces, how much the color is changing, the number of coats, and a variety of other factors. To get accurate pricing for your home, set up an estimate appointment with a local independently owned and operated CertaPro Painters® franchise. House Painting
When the primer is dry, caulk all small joints (less than ¼-inch-wide) in the siding and trim. Most pros use siliconized acrylics—paint won't stick to straight silicones—but Guertin and O'Neil like the new, more expensive urethane acrylics for their greater flexibility and longevity. O'Neil stresses that it's shortsighted to skimp on caulk. "If the joint fails, you're back to square one." Guertin uses the lifetime rating as his quality guide. "I don't expect 35-year caulk will last 35 years, but it should last longer than a 15-year caulk."
A: Paintzen has top-rated professional painters and is your one-stop shop painting service for all of greater New York City painting needs. New York City has always been on the cutting edge of innovation. For those looking for an innovative, on-demand residential painting service in New York, Paintzen is the smoothest path to a fresh coat of paint. House Painting
The health and safety of our painters and customers is Paintzen’s top priority. It also remains a priority for us to support our local paint contractor partners across the country during this unprecedented time. Because home renovations have been deemed “non-essential” many painters on our platform are without work. To help our partners get back in business as soon as it is declared safe to do so, we are announcing our Book Now, Schedule Later policy. House Painting
Prime. Dark colors, stains (once sealed), and previously unpainted surfaces (drywall, spackle, etc.) will need a primer coat, usually white. NOTE: most paint stores & home improvement centers will now tint primer (at no charge) to match fairly close to the color of the finished coat, that way two coats of primer need not be applied.[6] Although not all surfaces need a prime coat, skip this step at your peril! Dark colors will likely show through the first -- or even the first couple-- topcoats of paint. Sealants and unpainted surfaces like spackle patches will absorb or repel moisture in a topcoat at a different level than the areas surrounding them. Applying a good primer coat will help even out these differences. Primer equalizes a wall to a uniform surface. It's like erasing a canvas before drawing a new picture. Although some will argue the point, you generally don't need to spend a great deal on primer or buy special primer. A cheap, 5 gallon (18.9 L) bucket of plain, flat white paint will usually do the trick and cover a large area. Give your primer at least 24 hours to dry (follow its instructions) before applying a topcoat. House Painting

Susan Williams, an interior designer at Siren Betty Design, first used Gentleman's Gray (2062-20), a dark blue by Benjamin Moore when designing rooms for a local bed-and-breakfast. Shortly after, everyone at her company fell heads over heels for the shade. "We loved it so much that we painted our office wall the same color. We think it looks especially great in a gloss finish—the way the light reflects off it is gorgeous and gives any room a lot of character." A blueish gray this deep gives a serene, comforting vibe, which works well in a bedroom. House Painting
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