Prime. Dark colors, stains (once sealed), and previously unpainted surfaces (drywall, spackle, etc.) will need a primer coat, usually white. NOTE: most paint stores & home improvement centers will now tint primer (at no charge) to match fairly close to the color of the finished coat, that way two coats of primer need not be applied.[6] Although not all surfaces need a prime coat, skip this step at your peril! Dark colors will likely show through the first -- or even the first couple-- topcoats of paint. Sealants and unpainted surfaces like spackle patches will absorb or repel moisture in a topcoat at a different level than the areas surrounding them. Applying a good primer coat will help even out these differences. Primer equalizes a wall to a uniform surface. It's like erasing a canvas before drawing a new picture. Although some will argue the point, you generally don't need to spend a great deal on primer or buy special primer. A cheap, 5 gallon (18.9 L) bucket of plain, flat white paint will usually do the trick and cover a large area. Give your primer at least 24 hours to dry (follow its instructions) before applying a topcoat. House Painting

It's up to you. Outside is much harder because it requires more prep, patience, time, help, money and of course, effort. I have been painting my own houses and rental properties interiors for 20 years, and I painted the exterior of one, once. I then had it promptly done again by professionals who said it would have been cheaper if they didn't have to undo my work first. My advice is to get pros for the outside because everyone will see it. House Painting


For walls, measure the linear feet of wall space (measuring along the baseboards) for the areas to be painted (using a tape measure, laser, or both). Then multiply this by the ceiling height (usually it is 7.5 or 8). If there are 2 story areas, measure them separately, and multiply them by double the regular wall height. Then multiply the total number by 2 (for 2 coats). House Painting
If you are looking for that perfect muted shade of green, interior designer Rebecca West from Seriously Happy Homes suggests Flora (AF 470) by Benjamin Moore. "The blue-green paint is rich without being too dark, and earthy without feeling too heavy. It pairs beautifully with medium and dark wood tones and works with a broad range of interior styles from traditional to modern." You can never go wrong with a soft sage colored paint, and it can instantly make any room feel more soothing and relaxing.
Small random-orbit or pad sanders make this job go faster. (Wallis first covers these boundaries with Synkoloid patching compound so no edge is visible after sanding.) As shown, you want to make sure that there is a feathered, smooth transition from exposed wood to old paint. For areas that might get close scrutiny, you can follow up with a 100- or 120-grit rubdown to erase any scratches.
Susan Williams, an interior designer at Siren Betty Design, first used Gentleman's Gray (2062-20), a dark blue by Benjamin Moore when designing rooms for a local bed-and-breakfast. Shortly after, everyone at her company fell heads over heels for the shade. "We loved it so much that we painted our office wall the same color. We think it looks especially great in a gloss finish—the way the light reflects off it is gorgeous and gives any room a lot of character." A blueish gray this deep gives a serene, comforting vibe, which works well in a bedroom. House Painting
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