Prime. Dark colors, stains (once sealed), and previously unpainted surfaces (drywall, spackle, etc.) will need a primer coat, usually white. NOTE: most paint stores & home improvement centers will now tint primer (at no charge) to match fairly close to the color of the finished coat, that way two coats of primer need not be applied.[6] Although not all surfaces need a prime coat, skip this step at your peril! Dark colors will likely show through the first -- or even the first couple-- topcoats of paint. Sealants and unpainted surfaces like spackle patches will absorb or repel moisture in a topcoat at a different level than the areas surrounding them. Applying a good primer coat will help even out these differences. Primer equalizes a wall to a uniform surface. It's like erasing a canvas before drawing a new picture. Although some will argue the point, you generally don't need to spend a great deal on primer or buy special primer. A cheap, 5 gallon (18.9 L) bucket of plain, flat white paint will usually do the trick and cover a large area. Give your primer at least 24 hours to dry (follow its instructions) before applying a topcoat. House Painting
Give your fireplace mantle an accent paint color, as this adds a quick update without having to tear anything out. In the kitchen, give your cabinets a new look with a douse of kitchen cabinet paint for an affordable and satisfying update. Countertop paint makes kitchen countertops look new again. You can do it yourself with a countertop paint kit in less than a weekend. A worn-out bathtub can look new with a coating of bathtub paint. Even your tiles can get a refresh or touch up, try tile paint on your backsplash or shower. Pro-tip: Use semi-gloss paint for kitchens and bathrooms as they wipe down easily. House Painting
Certain architectural styles define the essence of New York City, such as Art Deco, Italianate, Post-Modern, Deconstructivism, Beaux-Arts, and Gothic Revival. Our five boroughs: Manhattan, Queens, the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Staten Island are a melting pot of cultures, and this diversity is reflected in how homes are built, designed, and updated by their owners. House Painting

We can acquire paint products at much lower prices because of the quantity we purchase and our relationships with paint suppliers. In most cases, it will cost more to buy your own paint. In the event you still prefer to purchase your own paint, it is up to the independently owned and operated CertaPro Painters® franchise you are working with, so this is something you should bring up as you plan your painting project. House Painting
Plan the budget. Costs will vary greatly, depending on price and quality. Choosing mid to upper-grade paint, expect to pay in the area of $350.00 in paint alone for a 2000 sq. ft. house. Add another $100 to $200 in brushes, rollers, pans, tape, and other materials. Don't forget food, if you plan to feed your workforce. When it comes to materials, not all paints are equal. Some truly cover with one coat, some say they do but don't. Your costs will double if you have to apply two coats to everything, so buying the cheaper paint might cost more in the long run. Trust your paint professional salesman (to a certain degree) to tell you which paint to buy. You can generally go cheap on primer, expensive on top coats. House Painting
When you want to hire residential painters in New York to transform the interior of your residential property, quality and trust should never be compromised. Hiring professional painters is an absolute must. After over 10 years experience doing interior residential painting we really focus on customer satisfaction, from start to finish, so you can rely on us for your next interior residential painting project. House Painting
When the primer is dry, caulk all small joints (less than ¼-inch-wide) in the siding and trim. Most pros use siliconized acrylics—paint won't stick to straight silicones—but Guertin and O'Neil like the new, more expensive urethane acrylics for their greater flexibility and longevity. O'Neil stresses that it's shortsighted to skimp on caulk. "If the joint fails, you're back to square one." Guertin uses the lifetime rating as his quality guide. "I don't expect 35-year caulk will last 35 years, but it should last longer than a 15-year caulk."
Susan Williams, an interior designer at Siren Betty Design, first used Gentleman's Gray (2062-20), a dark blue by Benjamin Moore when designing rooms for a local bed-and-breakfast. Shortly after, everyone at her company fell heads over heels for the shade. "We loved it so much that we painted our office wall the same color. We think it looks especially great in a gloss finish—the way the light reflects off it is gorgeous and gives any room a lot of character." A blueish gray this deep gives a serene, comforting vibe, which works well in a bedroom. House Painting
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