When the primer is dry, caulk all small joints (less than ¼-inch-wide) in the siding and trim. Most pros use siliconized acrylics—paint won't stick to straight silicones—but Guertin and O'Neil like the new, more expensive urethane acrylics for their greater flexibility and longevity. O'Neil stresses that it's shortsighted to skimp on caulk. "If the joint fails, you're back to square one." Guertin uses the lifetime rating as his quality guide. "I don't expect 35-year caulk will last 35 years, but it should last longer than a 15-year caulk." House Painting

Priming is compulsory if you're painting over a darker color, or on a new drywall, but it's a good idea to include this step before any paint job. A primer is necessary because it blocks any stains from bleeding through. It is also important because it prevents any blisters and paint-peeling by improving paint adhesion. Lastly, primer is a good idea as it allows complete single-coat coverage of the walls. If you want a better appearance, you can tint your primer with the final color you intend on using on the walls. Most paints today come with inbuilt primers, but an old school primer is still a better option. Before you start painting, remember to use painter's tape to cover your door frames, window sills, and any switches on the wall.
There's an insurmountable number of popular interior paint colors you can choose. Deciding which shade is one thing, and figuring out what room to cover it in is a whole other beast. That is why we narrowed down your choices to a handful of tried and true shades favored by decorating experts for various rooms to help make your decision a little easier. House Painting
Paintzen color expert Kristen Chuber shares her top paint color, which is a dusty Chalky Blue (PPG1153-5) by PPG Porter Paints. "Somewhere between blue and gray, this velvety shade can actually be used as a neutral. It looks beautiful with bright white trim, but maybe even more impactful with rich, black accents. We have also seen this shade used beautifully in a monochromatic palette, alongside other shades of blue-gray, both on the lighter and darker side of the spectrum." Try using this hue in your kitchen, one of your bathrooms, or in the bedroom. House Painting
Plan the schedule. Get a grip on the time it will take to bring the project to fruition. Plan for time to move furniture, wall prep, cut in, the painting itself, eating and breaks, and don't forget cleanup and bringing furniture back in. As you plan, err on the side of prudence. Unforeseen events will slow you down, so allow time for these. Remember, this is a multi-day project. Don't try to fit too much into a day. If you move faster than planned, great! House Painting

For walls, measure the linear feet of wall space (measuring along the baseboards) for the areas to be painted (using a tape measure, laser, or both). Then multiply this by the ceiling height (usually it is 7.5 or 8). If there are 2 story areas, measure them separately, and multiply them by double the regular wall height. Then multiply the total number by 2 (for 2 coats). House Painting
Susan Williams, an interior designer at Siren Betty Design, first used Gentleman's Gray (2062-20), a dark blue by Benjamin Moore when designing rooms for a local bed-and-breakfast. Shortly after, everyone at her company fell heads over heels for the shade. "We loved it so much that we painted our office wall the same color. We think it looks especially great in a gloss finish—the way the light reflects off it is gorgeous and gives any room a lot of character." A blueish gray this deep gives a serene, comforting vibe, which works well in a bedroom. House Painting
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